John Stanser

(27 January 1724 - )
     John Stanser was christened on 27 January 1724 in Rotherham, Yorkshire. He was the son of Edward Stanser.

John Stanser

(14 March 1722 - before 1735)
     John Stanser was also known as Stanza in records. He was christened on 14 March 1722 in North Wheatley, Nottinghamshire. Johannes Stanza, Gervisi & Anna. He was the son of Gervas Stanser and Ann Unknown (Stanser).
     John died before 1735.

John Stanser

(13 November 1709 - )
     John Stanser was also known as Stanzer in records. He was christened on 13 November 1709 in Blyth, Nottinghamshire. John, son of Peter Stanzer of Norney. He was the son of Peter Stanser and Mary Downhill.

John Stanser

(4 July 1779 - before 22 May 1785)
     John Stanser was christened on 4 July 1779 in Sutton cum Lound, Nottinghamshire. He was the son of Richard Stanser and Ann Barton.
     John died before 22 May 1785 in Sutton cum Lound, Nottinghamshire. He was buried on 22 May 1785 in Sutton cum Lound.

John Stanser

(12 March 1758 - )
     John Stanser was also known as Stancer in records. He was born on 28 February 1758 in London. He was christened on 12 March 1758 in St Martin in the Fields, Westminster. He was the son of George Stanser and Hannah Hodgons.

John Stanser

(March 1877 - )
     John Stanser's birth was registered in the quarter ending in March 1877 in Sturton le Steeple, East Retford RD, Nottinghamshire. He was the son of George Stanser and Harriett Booth. John Stanser was christened on 4 March 1877 in Sturton le Steeple. Mary, John, James and Hannah were listed as the children of George Stanser in the 1881 census in Freemans Lane, Sturton le Steeple.
     John Stanser appeared on the 1901 census in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. John Stanser, 24, servant (boarder crossed out), chemist & druggist, worker, born Sturton, in the house of the Burrows brothers, chemists & druggists.
     John Stanser appeared on the 1911 census in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. John Stanser, 34, single, chemist shop assistant, born Sturton-le-Steeple, was a visitir in the household of Frederick George Barnes, a general dealer.

John Stanser

(say 1675 - )
     John Stanser was also known as Stanzer in records. John Stanser was also known as Stansell in records. He was born say 1675.
     John Stanser married Mary Wainwright before 1700.

Child of John Stanser and Mary Wainwright

Child of John Stanser

John Stanser

(say 1745 - )
     John Stanser was also known as Stancell in records. John Stanser was also known as Stanzer in records. He was born say 1745.
     John Stanser married Hannah Ogden on 24 December 1767 in Worsbrough, Yorkshire.

Child of John Stanser

John Stanser

(11 March 1791 - )
     John Stanser was also known as Stancel in records. He was christened on 11 March 1791 in Worsbrough, Yorkshire. He was the son of Matthew Stanser and Mary Cook.

John Stanser

(before 1720 - before 17 September 1745)
     John Stanser was born before 1720.
     John Stanser married Martha Cardale on 12 November 1741 in Braithwell, Yorkshire. John Stanser & Martha Cardale, both of this parish: certificate from Mr Hall, curate of Edlinton.
     John died before 17 September 1745 in Edlington, Yorkshire. This may be a son.

Child of John Stanser and Martha Cardale

John Stanser

(2 March 1778 - before 25 March 1828)
     John Stanser was also known as Stansar in records. John Stanser was also known as Stancer in records. He was born on 2 March 1778 in Rutland. His age at death was 53 which suggests a birth before March 1775. He was the son of John Stanser and Eleanor Sims. John Stanser was christened on 6 April 1778 in Ketton cum Tixover, Rutland.
     John Stanser married Ann Wyles on 17 July 1801 in Easton on the Hill, Northamptonshire. John Stansar of this parish & Ann Wyles of Ketton, Rutland, by licence.
     John died before 25 March 1828 in Easton on the Hill, Northamptonshire. He was buried on 25 March 1828 in Easton on the Hill.

Children of John Stanser and Ann Wyles

John Stanser

(8 June 1810 - )
     John Stanser was christened on 8 June 1810 in Ketton, Rutland. He was the son of John Stanser and Ann Wyles.
     -He was implicated in the murder of Elizabeth Longfoot and ran away.
6th March 1838: Murder at Easton-on-the-Hill. Elizabeth Longfoot was murdered between three and four o'clock on the morning of Tuesday, 6th March. She was an eccentric woman, described as "old", but still in her forties.
Henry Goddard, the Bow Street Runner, was called into Northamptonshire for the second time, to work on the case. In 1842 he was to become the first Chief Constable of Northamptonshire. His memoirs are not very helpful toa modern student, because, writing many years later, his memory was at fault, and he made mistakes. The body of Elizabeth was not found floating "on the surface" of a well. She was found lying behind her kitchen door.
Much of the evidence is confused and confusing, because of the attempts to induce the accused men to testify against one another, and the consequent accusations and counter accusations. In fact the prosecution case was bungled, as will be seen.
The events of the morning of the crime will be reserved until the account of the trial, in which Easton-on-the-Hill villagers gave their eye-witness testimony. A report in 'The Times' says that magistrates questioned over a dozen suspects and released them all except three brothers named Archer, who were released on the following day when Andrew Porter, a baker, was arrested. One of the Archer brothers, John, was eventually charged. Goddard says that he was the only officer in town when the messenger arrived at the Bow Street office to request assistance. He travelled by the night mail and arrived at Stamford early the next morning. He met William Read, the senior police officer of the Borough of Stamford, and together they went to Easton to see the scene of the crime. They measured footprints, but Goddard says that the size of them caused them to suspect a large-footed "lay-about" named Stancer, whereas, Read said that the foot-prints led them to John Archer. Goddard goes on to say that Stancer's sister reported him missing since the murder. He and Read trailed the fugitive from Easton to Bourne, Gosperton, Deeping, Peterborough, Spalding, and finally Uppingham, where he was arrested, with money in his possession. On being lodged in Oundle bridewell, and charged with being accessory to murder, Stancer admitted that he was present when the murder had been done, but that the murderers were Jack Archer and Richard Woodward. Goddard and Read set off on the trail of Archer and Woodward, through Weedon, Crick, Colly Weston, Barnack, Market Deeping, Duddington, and finally back to Easton-on-the-Hill, where they were found and arrested. The two prisoners were placed in different lock-ups, Stamford and Oakham, "so that there should be no communication". Woodward asked Goddard who had given the evidence against him, and was told that it was Stancer. He admitted that he had been concerned in robbing the woman's house, but not in murdering her. He said that he was a bricklayer by trade, and wanted money to "take him to America". His only part in the murder, he said was to force the back door open with a mortar chisel.
Before the magistrates, Stancer was admitted as an approver (one who gives King's evidence), and the other two were committed for trial at the next Northampton Assizes.
The 'Lincoln Gazette' of 5th May 1838 carried the following report: "John Stansor [sic], a labourer, who absconded from the village [of Easton-on-the-Hill] on the morning of the murder of Elizabeth Longfoot... has been taken into custody. He was discovered concealed at Willow Hall near Peterborough, and has made a voluntarty confession implicating himself and ... John Archer and Richard Woodward, both of Easton, in the robbery and murder.... He stated that the two men and himself having framed the design to rob her, they also determined on murdering her to prevent the possibility of her appearing against them in a court of justice. The hour of four o'clock on the morning of the 6th March having been fixed upon, they went to the house, and were proceeding to remove some boards when she was alarmed by the noise, and she suddenly opened the door of the house and ran into the street crying 'Murder, thieves'. She returned however, almost immediately, to the house,and just as she was going to the window of the wash-house, Archer rushed from a dark nook close by and knocked the old woman down. He pressed his knuckles against her throat, and after a short struggle, she was dead. Woodward then took a 'plough-line' from his pocket and having fastened it round the neck of the deceased, they houled the body into the house, and shut and locked the door. They then secured the money, silver spoons and other things, left the house by the back way, and divided the plunder at a pond in an adjoining field. Woodward admitted that the statement made by Stansor, which was repeated in his presence, was correct, and seemed to think that he had some right to expect mercy, as his was not the hand that accomplished the murder. Archer stongly denied his guilt.
After the magistrates had heard all the evidence the three prisoners were committed to take their trial for murder at the Assizes."
At the Summer Assizes at Northampton on 17th July, there was a surprise. Woodward, Archer and Stansor were brought up, but instead of pleas being heard, an affidavit was read. "Mr Farrant, a surgeon," and William Read, the Stamford constable, had been on their way to the Assizes in a gig, when the horse fell. Read had broken his arm and was "otherwise so severely injured to render his attendance impossible." The prisoners were remanded till the next Assizes. Whether the affidavit was at fault, or, more likely, the 'Northampton Mercury' reporter, the information was incorrect. "Farrant" was not a surgeon: he was Farrer, the Magistrates' Clerk who was to testify that he had taken down Stansor's deposition. He and Read were, of course, vital prosecution witnesses. The surgeon was almost certainly the one who signed the affidavit to certify their incapacity. The case did not come up at the next Assizes, perhaps because the two injured witnesses had not recovered. The postponement was for eight months, the case eventually coming before Lord Denman at Northamptonshire Lent Assizes on 4th March 1839. The case took all day, and according to Goddard was still being heard at eight o'clock in the evening. Richard Woodward and John Archer only were on trial, althought John Stansor was produced to give evidence for the prosecution, during the course of which he said that he had been charged with the murder. The first witness was H. Broughton: "I live at Easton ...and I knew Mrs Longfoot. She lived near me and was about 40 or 50 years old .... She was a person of eccentric habits, and for the last few months appeared to be deranged. She had an orchard and used to sell the fruit. The boys used to annoy her...." (Broughton kept a boarding school for young gentlemen, and he was referring to his pupils.) "I have heard her raving and abusing in the street. I heard her being murdered on Tuesday morning, March 6th. I live abour 80 or 90 yards from the spot. I heard her cry out, about a quarter to four that morning. She was raving in the street in her habitual way, and I did not think anything of it".
John Hudson: I live at Easton....I heard her cry "murder" three times on the morning of March 6th.... My daughter was in the room with me, and went to the window.
Lawrence Thompson: I live opposite the house of the deceased.... On the morning of the murder, a little before four o'clock, I heard a woman cry our "Murder!" three times. I got up and dressed myself in about four minutes, not putting on my stockings. I went to the window and opened it. I heard a noise like vomiting. My brother went with me to Mrs Longfoot's gate, which we found locked ... There is a yard between the gate and the door, in with there is a well. There was a hay stack.... I heard a key turned in the door. I remained about three minutes, and then went to the window shutters of the bottom room, in the street. I saw a light within the house, and went across the road to a high piece of ground whence we could see a light in the upper room.... I left my
brother watching, whilst I went to feed my horses.
Richard Thompson confirmed his brother's evidence, and added: "I waited at the door about five minutes, and then went to Mrs Eaton's wash-house, where I saw the washerwoman. I went to bed and got up about a quarter to seven o'clock, when people were running to Mrs Longfoot's. I went, and saw her lying dead on her back just within the door. About the entrance to the door, near the deceased's feet, there were marks of blood and the print of a man's knee."
Sarah Claypole: I live at Easton, and knew the deceased. I was going to work at Mr Broughton's in the morning of the murder, about half past six o'clock. I saw her pattens and a shoe in the yard, just within the gate. I mentioned this at Mr Broughton's, and Anne Wild and James Newman went back with me. Anne Wild said, "Poor creature, here she lies!" I saw marks outside the door, on the slab, as if she had been drawn through the dirt into the house.
Pattens were wooden shoe soles raised on slats, used to slip on when walking through mud as found in unpaved streets.
From Sarah Claypole's evidence, Anne Wild was the one who found the body. This is her testimony:
"I am a widow.... I went back with Sarah Claypole to Mrs Lightfoot's, and found Newman listening at the door. I picked up the shoe and pattens, and seeing the key inside the door, I put my hand on the latch, and the door opened. I saw the body with feet towards the door, and the face towards the window.... The bonnet and cap were pushed quite back. I moved the head, and blood trickled from the left side of the face.
There were marks of blood outside, and the print of the knee of corded breeches.... The place was in great disorder, and a bunch of keys was hanging in a drawer. The beds did not appear to have been slept in.... There was a half-burnt candle in a candle-stick on the stairs. Next day I observed black places on the neck, as if made by pressure of knuckles. By "next day", Anne Wild meant at the inquest. She had not quite finished at the trial: she was re-called after a recess to answer a question about the scene of the murder. "An hour or two after I had been at the deceased woman's, I saw the door of the back kitchen open."
The Easton-on-the-Hill constable, Thomas Allen, gave an account of his visit to the scene of the crime. Then he was cross-examined by Mr Miller who was representing the prisoner Woodward. He agreed that he had not known the whereabouts of Stansor until Woodward had told him that he might be found at Bourne. He said that a warrant was out against Stansor -- for poaching.
The next witness was Mark Wilson Jackson, a Stamford surgeon:- "I saw the body lying on a table in the room next the kitchen. The side and head were bloody. Next day, before the Coroner, I examined the body. I found a wound, half an inch long and a quarter inch thick, on the left side of the head. It was in incised wound, as if from the sharp end of a mason's hammer or a mortar chisel. This wound might have knocked her down, but could not have killed her. On the right side of the neck and lower jaw, there were the marks of a man's fist, such as, by long pressure, would cause suffocation. I opened the body, and found the lungs distended, and full of black blood, which would result from strangulation...."
William Read, "Chief Constable" of Stamford was called. He was at the house at eight o'clock, and examined the knee mark in the blood.
"The woodwork of the kitchen window seemed to have been taken out by a chisel. I examined Whitehead's premises, which are much lower down than those of the deceased. There is a wall between the haystack and the yard, and these premises. Near the haystack, I saw footmarks of one man, as if he had come over the wall. I measured the footmarks and examined the shoes of the prisoners. Archer's feet correspond in size, but there were marks of nails, but no nails in his shoes. I got the shoes from his house, and his mother said they were his Sunday shoes. In consequence of having intercepted a letter, I took the prisoner into custody on Wednesday, April 4th, at Willow Hall in the county of Cambridge."
Mr Miller, for the defence: How long after the murder was it that you compared Archer's shoes with the marks?
Read: I compared them on the day after the murder.
Miller: What did you say to Stansor about his being admitted to Queen's evidence?
Read: I never said anything to him.
Many expected Stansor's evidence to be decisive. He was the next to give evidence.
John Stansor: I am brought out of gaol to give evidence against the prisoners. I have been charged with the murder myself. I have known the prisoners ever since they were lads. About a fortnight before the murder, I saw them at the opening of the Fox and Hounds, on Friday night. Woodward said, "Stansor, I want you to go along with Archer and me, to do old Tetty." I said "No, I won't have nothing to do with it. It's a comical job...." Archer came up .... and after a good deal of persuasion I agreed to go [They drank together, and then Stansor drank with others.] We went up the street and the clocks were striking three. Woodward pulled a chisel from his pocket, and said that would do to open the boxes .... We took the casement out with it, and Mrs Longfoot came to the window and [shouted] .... She then came out into the yard, and swore and blustered about, whilst we hid behind the haystack. Samuel Mitchell passed, and asked what was the matter. She told him to go on; it was nothing to do with him. We parted that morning, and on the Wednesday following, Woodward [renewed the proposition] .... About nine o'clock on the night of the murder, I saw Woodward and Archer. Archer refused to go and drink in the public house,telling Woodward that he would come when it was time to go, and say "Robin Hood, come out". I went to my sister's and lay down. It was three o'clock when Woodward came and rolled a stone against the door. Two sisters of mine, and a brother, were upstairs. He opened the gate, and propped it open with a stone, and told me to stay and watch. Archer put his head through the window, but he could not get in. Woodward did. He got in, and went to the door, and called, "Tetty". She came downstairs and went into the street, shouting and swearing. I stood against the haystack. The others were by the well. She could not see us. She locked the door and took the key with her.... When she came against the window, Archer knocked her down with his left hand, and Woodward struck her with the chisel. Archer fell on her and throttled her. He was kneeling on her, and she was gurgling in the throat as if she was sick. Woodward put a cord round her neck, and took the key out of her pocket, and unlocked the door. Archer pulled her into the house with the cord. I was going away [but] ... Archer cursed me for my cowardice.... I went in, and as soon as the door was locked, we heard persons come.... I followed the others upstairs with a candle. It was burning on the table when we got in. Woodward drew the curtains in the upper room. He took the keys out of Mrs
Lightfoot's pocket, and opened the drawer. There were sovereigns in it. Archer put these in his right hand pocket. We found money and bills in other drawers, which Woodward and Archer pocketed. Woodward saw two persons crossing the road.... He took the cord off her neck, and as we went out, Archer pointed to the body and said, "There the old bitch lies." Woodward said, "If it weren't so late, we would throw her into the well, and then it would be thought she killed herself." We all three went into a close called the Brook, and divided the money. I got three sovereigns and five shillings. On the same morning, I went to Bourne and stayed three days. Woodward came to me on the Saturday,and threatened to murder me if I got found out by changing the sovereigns. He told me to go in search of a job, and to keep out of the way because Archer was already taken up. I quitten Bourne and wandered about a hundred miles, going by the name of Thomas Islip. I was taken at Peterborough on suspicion of this murder.... On the following Tuesday, I confessed.
Thomas Masters: I know the prisoners, and Stansor. I was at the opening of the Fox and Hounds. I saw them there ...
Samuel Mitchell: After the opening of the Fox and Hounds, I went home about half past three in the morning. I saw Mrs Longfoot near her house, storming in the street.... I gound a stick on the morning of the murder, near the spot....[a stick produced].
Thomas Messam: I live at Tolthorpe....I saw Stansor and Woodward together at Bourne.
Henry Goddard: I am a Bow Street officer, and I was sent for in consequence of this murder. I saw Woodward on 12th April in stamford gaol. He said, "If you can promise a free pardon, I'll tell you about the murder at Easton. I said that was out of my power.... He then made a disclosure to me, and afterwards... before the magistrates.
At this point, Goddard was stopped from saying anything further about Woodward's statement. The reason would have been that the most acceptable evidence was the statement itself. Goddard left the witness box and his place was taken by the Clerk to the Stamford magistrates.
Nathaniel Farrant: I am Clerk to the magistrates...at Stamford. The examination of Woodward took place on 12th April. No promise or inducement was held out. The statement (referred to as "The Examination") was handed to Farrant and he read it. It referred to Woodward's visit to Stansor at Bourne, but described it as a "meeting". It alleged that Stansor told him how he had murdered Mrs Longfoot alone and kept all the money himself. It said that the incident Woodward had asked Stansor not to mention was the attempted robbery, earlier, in which he, Stansor and Archer had been involved.
Henry Goddard, re-called:- This was subsequent to the examination of Stansor.... On April 14th, I saw Woodward again, in custody, and he told me that..... he and Archer went with a ladder to Mrs Longfoot's house. They raised it in the street, but failed to get in through a window. They agreed that they would have to murder her to rob her.
...Woodward confessed to participating in the murder, and said that Stansor's statement was true...
Richard Whitehead: I am a farmer at Easton. Some days before the murder, I missed a ladder from my stack-yard. I saw it about a week later in Mr Phillips' yard.
William Brown: I was in Northampton gaol on 6th April, for cutting down some poles.
Archer and Woodward were brought into the yard I was in. Archer spoke of the murder. When Mrs Longfoot came in he stood behind the gate, he aimed a blow at her, but missed. Woodward struck her, and then again with the chisel. Woodward put a cord round her neck and dragged her indoors. Her shoe and patten came off ... Woodward took what he could find upstairs. Stansor remained in the yard. He had five sovereigns and five shillings. They left in different directions.....These particulars were ralated to me at different times in the prison-yard. I saw Woodward in July, in the "Glory Hole". I was there for stealing Mr Morton's ducks. He showed me a letter, and he told me, as a secret, that he had a double-barrelled gun hidden under a stack.
Woodward was in Number eleven, and I was in Number ten. We used to talk to each other between the iron rails. Woodward said he had some money in a hole in Mr Rayson's grounds, and some sovereigns in the ceiling of his brother's house.
Mr Miller, for the defence, cross-examining: Have you heard of a reward of a hundred pounds for the conviction of the prisoners?
Brown: I have.
Miller: My Lord, I should like to have Allen, the constable of Easton-on-the-Hill re-called. The parish constable took position in the witness box.
Miller: Did you search Woodward's house at Easton?
Thomas Allen: I did.
Miller: Did you search the roof?
Allen: I searched the roof, but found no money.
Miller addressed the jusry. His "eloquent, fervid and effective" speech endured for four hours. One of the important points he raised was whether it was possible for prisoners in Northampton gaol to communicate with each other in the manner described by William Brown. Lord Denman, the judge, edidently took this point, and although it was late in the day, he sent for the Governor of the gaol before commencing his summing up. Mr Grant, the Governor of the prison was present in Court when Denman finished.
Grant: It is impossible that the prisoners in their cells could converse in whispers. They would need to speak as loud as I am now giving evidence, and there is an officer continually on duty, so they must surely be heard, and would be liable to punishment in close confinement.
Henry Goddard, in his memoirs, says that the jury had a "long retirement" but they were in consultation for a short time. They found both prisoners not guilty. Goddard says that the verdict caused "surprise and astonishment" to the Judge and "everyone in court". He also tells us that later inquiries proved that prisoners in Northampton gaol were fully able to communicate with one another in the manner described by Brown. The modern reader may well decide however, that the prosecution was using Stansor to "frame" Woodward and Archer. That is certainly what the defence council, Miller, wanted the jury to believe.
Patrick Pringle, the editor of Henry Goddard's memoirs, quotes the "Annual Register" description of the reaction to the verdict in Easton-on-the-Hill. The inhabitants were called to assemble by "the call of a drum", and attacked Archer's house. His furniture was smashed and scattered in fragments in the streets. Woodward's property was subjected to similar treatment. The uproar did not abate until after midnight, but the villagers were unable to find either Archer or Woodward
.

John Stanser

(before 1750 - )
     John Stanser was also known as Stansor in records. He was born before 1750. He may be the John baptised at Duddington in 1743.
     John Stanser lived at Rutland, between 1769 and 1785.
     John Stanser married Eleanor Sims on 1 April 1769 in Ketton cum Tixover, Rutland.

Children of John Stanser and Eleanor Sims

John Stanser

(say 1750 - )
     John Stanser was born say 1750. He may be the John baptised at Duddington in 1743.
     John Stanser married Elizabeth Unknown before 1775.

Child of John Stanser and Elizabeth Unknown

John Stanser

(26 February 1775 - )
     John Stanser was born on 26 February 1775 in Dunholme, Lincolnshire. He was the son of John Stanser and Elizabeth Unknown. John Stanser was christened on 5 March 1775 in Dunholme.

John Stanser

(13 June 1743 - )
     John Stanser was also known as Stansor in records. He was christened on 13 June 1743 in Duddington, Northamptonshire. He was the son of Elizabeth Stanser.
     He may be the John Stansor who fathered a daughter Elizabeth with Anne Taylor who was christened 1763 at Woodnewton Church of England 20 Mar 1763.

Child of John Stanser and Ann Taylor

John Stanser

( - before 31 May 1801)
     John died before 31 May 1801 in Wrawby?, Lincolnshire. He was buried on 31 May 1801 in Wrawby.

John Stanser

(before 1720? - )
     John Stanser was born before 1720?.
     John Stanser married Mary Unknown.

Child of John Stanser and Mary Unknown

John Stanser

( - September 1853)
     John Stanser was also known as Stancer in records. He was born in Weymouth, Dorset.
     John Stanser married Martha Unknown before 1836.
     John Stanser and Martha Unknown were recorded on the 1851 census in 6 Redcliffe Buildings, Bristol, St Mary Redcliffe, Gloucestershire. John Stancer, head, married 40, mariner, born Weymouth, Dorset, his wife Martha 34, born St Mary Redcliffe, daughter Silena Stancer 14, vest maker, Maria Stancer, 12, scholar, son John Stancer 8, all born St Mary Recliffe, Bristol. with a lodger Mary Williams, widow aged 58, parish pay.
     John's death was registered in the quarter ending in September 1853 in Bristol RD.

Children of John Stanser and Martha Unknown

John Stanser

(circa 1844 - )
     John Stanser was born circa 1844 in Bristol, Gloucestershire. He was the son of John Stanser and Martha Unknown.

John Stanser

(before 1700 - )
     John Stanser was born before 1700. John, as the father of the bride, attended John Stanser and Catharine Unknown's wedding before 1717.

Child of John Stanser and Catharine Unknown

John Stanser

(circa 1878 - 29 March 1942)
     John Stanser was born circa 1878.
     The marriage of John Stanser and Edith Mary Barnes was registered in the in September 1911 quarter in Gainsborough RD, Lincolnshire.
     John died on 29 March 1942 in Beverley, Yorkshire.

John Stanser

(before August 1711 - before 23 August 1711)
     John Stanser was born before August 1711. He was the son of Thomas Stanser and Dorothy Walker.
     John died before 23 August 1711 in Wheatley. He was buried on 23 August 1711 in St George, Doncaster. John Stansel son of Thomas Stansel, blacksmith of Wheatley.

John Bingham Stanser

(February 1845 - 24 January 1932)
     John Bingham Stanser was born in February 1845 in Sturton le Steeple, East Retford RD, Nottinghamshire. He was the son of William Stanser and Mary Cobb. John Bingham Stanser was christened on 29 October 1845 in Sturton le Steeple. Hannah, Catherine, Elizabeth, Mary, George, John, William and Thomas were listed as the children of William Stanser in the 1851 census in North St, Sturton le Steeple.
     John Bingham Stanser appeared on the 1861 census in East Retford. John B Stancer was a 16 year old apprentice, born Sturton with the Appleby family, chemist & druggists employing 3 apprentices and a boy.
     John Bingham Stanser married Jane Elizabeth Gravenor on 24 October 1867 in St Nicholas, Tuxford, Nottinghamshire. John Bingham Stanser was listed in a directory as Stanser & Barr, auctioneers, valuers, estate agents and corn, seed and tillage merchants. Church St & Crowgarth; John Bingham Stanser, auctioneer & merchant (Stanser & Barr) at Lord St, Gainsborough, Lincolnshire.
     John Bingham Stanser and Jane Elizabeth Gravenor appeared on the 1871 census in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. He was aged 26, an auctioneer, born at Sturton le Steeple with Jane Elizabeth born Fledborough and their daughter Florence aged 2, born Gainsborough.
     The partnership between John Bingham Stanser and John Barr, both of Gainsborough, auctioneers and licenced valuers was dissolved by mutual consent on 23 May 1872.
     John Bingham Stanser and Jane Elizabeth Gravenor appeared on the 1900 census in Red Cloud City, Webster, Nebraska, USA. John B Stanser, aged 55, born England, immigrated 1874 aged 26, retired; with his wife Jane E, aged 55, born Sep 1844, married 32 years, 2 children, born England emigated 1875 aged 25.
     John Bingham Stanser appeared on the census of 1910 in Ward 2, Red Cloud City, Webster, Nebraska, USA. John B Stanser, aged 65, born England, with his wife Jane E, aged 65, married 32 years, emigrated 1873. He was listed as a father-in-law in George Amack's household on the 1920 Census in Garfield, Webster, Nebraska, USA. George Amack, 52; his wife Flora Amack 57, Lester 21, Stanser 18, Edgar 15, John B Stanser, aged 74, born England, father in law, with his wife Jennie Stanser, aged 75. John Bingham Stanser was listed as a father-in-law in George Amack's household on the 1930 Census in Garfield, Webster Nebraska. George Amack 62, Flora E Amack 61, Edgar R Amack 25, John B Stanser 85.
     John died on 24 January 1932 in Red Cloud, Webster County, Nebraska, USA, aged 86. He was aged 87, and buried there 31 Jan 1932.

Children of John Bingham Stanser and Jane Elizabeth Gravenor

John Henry Stanser

(December 1878 - 15 October 1961)
     John Henry Stanser's birth was registered in the quarter ending in December 1878 in Lea, Gainsborough RD, Lincolnshire. He was the son of William Bingham Stanser and Mary Ellis.
     John Henry Stanser appeared on the 1901 census in Horncastle, Lincolnshire. John H Stanser, 22, grocer, born at Lea, was a boarder with Leonard Brooks, joiner and his wife Sarah A. He was listed in the 1911 census in Sturton le Steeple as a visitor in the household of James Arthur Stanser .
     John Henry Stanser married Frances J Goulding in December 1923 in East Retford RD, Nottinghamshire. John Henry Stanser was an executor of William Bingham Stanser's estate on 6 February 1932 in Lincoln, Lincolnshire. John Henry Stanser was an executor of Kate Stanser's estate on 6 February 1939 in the Principal Probate Registry, London.
     John died on 15 October 1961 in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, aged 82.
     His will was proved on 8 December 1961. John Henry Stanser of 79 Willingham Rd, Knaith Park, Gainsborough, Lincs, died 15 Oct 1961, at the John Coupland Hospital , Grainsborough. Probate to Richard Groves Stanser, engineer.

John Henry Stanser

(September 1890 - 15 October 1961)
     John Henry Stanser's birth was registered in the quarter ending in September 1890 in Easton on the Hill, Stamford RD, Northamptonshire. He was the son of Joseph Stancer and Harriett Pickaver. Lizzie, Joseph, Maud, Horace and John were listed as the children of Joseph Stancer in the 1891 census in Church St, Easton on the Hill, Northamptonshire.
     John died on 15 October 1961 in Lincolnshire aged 71.

Jonathan Taylor Stanser

(December 1843 - before 30 July 1850)
     Jonathan Taylor Stanser's birth was registered in the quarter ending in December 1843 in Horncastle RD, Lincolnshire. He was the son of Jonathan Buttery Stancer and Ann Taylor. Jonathan Taylor Stanser was christened on 14 January 1844 in Asterby, Lincolnshire.
     Jonathan died before 30 July 1850 in Binbrook, Lincolnshire. He was buried on 30 July 1850 in St Mary, Binbrook.

Joseph Stanser

(22 December 1782 - )
     Joseph Stanser was christened on 22 December 1782 in St Leonard's, Wortley, Yorkshire. He was the son of James Stanser.

Kate Stanser

(December 1872 - 5 January 1939)
     Kate Stanser's birth was registered in the quarter ending in December 1872 in Lea, Gainsborough RD, Lincolnshire. She was the daughter of William Bingham Stanser and Mary Ellis. Kate Stanser was listed as Mary Cobb's granddaughter in the 1881 census in North St, Sturton le Steeple. Kate, William and James were listed as William Bingham Stanser's children in the 1901 census in Lea, Lincolnshire. Kate Stanser was an executor of William Bingham Stanser's estate on 6 February 1932 in Lincoln, Lincolnshire. She was a spinster.
     Kate died on 5 January 1939 in 3 Vanlentine Rd, Hoylake, Cheshire, aged 66.
     Her will was proved on 6 February 1939 in the Principal Probate Registry, London.

Laura Stanser

(December 1859 - )
     Laura Stanser's birth was registered in the quarter ending in December 1859 in Sturton le Steeple, Nottinghamshire. She was the daughter of William Stanser and Mary Cobb. George, Elizabeth, William, James and Laura were listed as the children of William Stanser in the 1861 census in Sturton le Steeple.
     Laura Stanser appeared on the 1871 census in Beck St, Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. Laura Stanser, aged 11, was a boarder in a school headed by the Mitchell family, born Sturton. Laura, Sarah and Elizabeth were listed as the children of Mary Cobb in the 1881 census in North St, Sturton le Steeple.
     Laura Stanser married Walter Gude Harris on 15 June 1893 in Sturton le Steeple.